A comparison of the republic by plato and meditations on first philosophy by rene descartes in philo

The only apprehension I entertain is lest the title should deter some who have not been brought up to letters, or with whom philosophy is in bad repute, because the kind they were taught has proved unsatisfactory; and this makes me think that it will be useful to add a preface to it for the purpose of showing what the MATTER of the work is, what END I had in view in writing it, and what UTILITY may be derived from it. But although it might be my part to write a preface of this nature, seeing I ought to know those particulars better than any other person, I cannot nevertheless prevail upon myself to do anything more than merely to give a summary of the chief points that fall, as I think, to be discussed in it: It will accordingly be necessary thereafter to endeavour so to deduce from those principles the knowledge of the things that depend on them, as that there may be nothing in the whole series of deductions which is not perfectly manifest. God is in truth the only being who is absolutely wise, that is, who possesses a perfect knowledge of all things; but we may say that men are more or less wise as their knowledge of the most important truths is greater or less.

A comparison of the republic by plato and meditations on first philosophy by rene descartes in philo

As Descartes explained, "we cannot doubt of our existence while we doubt While other knowledge could be a figment of imagination, deception, or mistake, Descartes asserted that the very act of doubting one's own existence served—at minimum—as proof of the reality of one's own mind; there must be a thinking entity —in this case the self —for there to be a thought.

In Descartes's writings Descartes first wrote the phrase in French in his Discourse on the Method. He referred to it in Latin without explicitly stating the familiar form of the phrase in his Meditations on First Philosophy. The earliest written record of the phrase in Latin is in his Principles of Philosophywhere, in a margin note see belowhe provides a clear explanation of his intent: Fuller forms of the phrase are attributable to other authors.

Discourse on the Method The phrase first appeared in French in Descartes's Discourse on the Method in the first paragraph of its fourth part: Accordingly, seeing that our senses sometimes deceive us, I was willing to suppose that there existed nothing really such as they presented to us; And because some men err in reasoning, and fall into Paralogisms, even on the simplest matters of Geometry, I, convinced that I was as open to error as any other, rejected as false all the reasonings I had hitherto taken for Demonstrations; And finally, when I considered that the very same thoughts presentations which we experience when awake may also be experienced when we are asleep, while there is at that time not one of them true, I supposed that all the objects presentations that had ever entered into my mind when awake, had in them no more truth than the illusions of my dreams.

But immediately upon this I observed that, whilst I thus wished to think that all was false, it was absolutely necessary that I, who thus thought, should be something; And as I observed that this truth, I think, therefore I am,[e] was so certain and of such evidence that no ground of doubt, however extravagant, could be alleged by the Sceptics capable of shaking it, I concluded that I might, without scruple, accept it as the first principle of the philosophy of which I was in search.

While we thus reject all of which we can entertain the smallest doubt, and even imagine that it is false, we easily indeed suppose that there is neither God, nor sky, nor bodies, and that we ourselves even have neither hands nor feet, nor, finally, a body; but we cannot in the same way suppose that we are not while we doubt of the truth of these things; for there is a repugnance in conceiving that what thinks does not exist at the very time when it thinks.

Accordingly, the knowledge,[m] I think, therefore I am,[e] is the first and most certain that occurs to one who philosophizes orderly. That we cannot doubt of our existence while we doubt, and that this is the first knowledge we acquire when we philosophize in order.

Ann Banfield writes also following Lyons"In order for the statement on which Descartes's argument depends to represent certain knowledge, … its tense must be a true present—in English, a progressive, … not as 'I think' but as 'I am thinking, in conformity with the general translation of the Latin or French present tense in such nongeneric, nonstative contexts.

The earliest known translation as "I am thinking, therefore I am" is from by Charles Porterfield Krauth.

A comparison of the republic by plato and meditations on first philosophy by rene descartes in philo

Krauth"That cannot doubt which does not think, and that cannot think which does not exist. I doubt, I think, I exist.

In the Meditations, Descartes phrases the conclusion of the argument as "that the proposition, I am, I exist, is necessarily true whenever it is put forward by me or conceived in my mind. In his belief in his own existence, he finds that it is impossible to doubt that he exists.

Even if there were a deceiving god or an evil demonone's belief in their own existence would be secure, for there is no way one could be deceived unless one existed in order to be deceived. But I have convinced myself that there is absolutely nothing in the world, no sky, no earth, no minds, no bodies.

Does it now follow that I, too, do not exist? If I convinced myself of something [or thought anything at all], then I certainly existed. But there is a deceiver of supreme power and cunning who deliberately and constantly deceives me.

In that case, I, too, undoubtedly exist, if he deceives me; and let him deceive me as much as he can, he will never bring it about that I am nothing, so long as I think that I am something. So, after considering everything very thoroughly, I must finally conclude that the proposition, I am, I exist, is necessarily true whenever it is put forward by me or conceived in my mind.

First, he claims only the certainty of his own existence from the first-person point of view — he has not proved the existence of other minds at this point. This is something that has to be thought through by each of us for ourselves, as we follow the course of the meditations.

Second, he does not say that his existence is necessary; he says that if he thinks, then necessarily he exists see the instantiation principle. Third, this proposition "I am, I exist" is held true not based on a deduction as mentioned above or on empirical induction but on the clarity and self-evidence of the proposition.

Descartes does not use this first certainty, the cogito, as a foundation upon which to build further knowledge; rather, it is the firm ground upon which he can stand as he works to discover further truths[33] As he puts it: Archimedes used to demand just one firm and immovable point in order to shift the entire earth; so I too can hope for great things if I manage to find just one thing, however slight, that is certain and unshakable.

As a consequence of this demonstration, Descartes considers science and mathematics to be justified to the extent that their proposals are established on a similarly immediate clarity, distinctiveness, and self-evidence that presents itself to the mind.

The originality of Descartes's thinking, therefore, is not so much in expressing the cogito — a feat accomplished by other predecessors, as we shall see — but on using the cogito as demonstrating the most fundamental epistemological principle, that science and mathematics are justified by relying on clarity, distinctiveness, and self-evidence.

Baruch Spinoza in " Principia philosophiae cartesianae " at its Prolegomenon identified "cogito ergo sum" the "ego sum cogitans" I am a thinking being as the thinking substance with his ontological interpretation. It can also be considered that Cogito ergo sum is needed before any living being can go further in life".

But if life itself is good and pleasantScience Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell. Excerpt from The Republic. Plato (/ BC / BC) 4. Excerpt from The Meditations in First Philosophy. René Descartes (). Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy, was published in , designed for the philosopher and for the theologian.

However many scientists were opposed to Descartes ' ideas including Arnauld, Hobbes and Gassendi. Rene Descartes’ Meditations in the First Philosophy is a skeptic’s speculation on certain inalienable truths. Descartes meditations are based on the epistemological theory of rationalism: that is if someone truly knows something then they could not possibly be mistaken.

Doubt, Dualism, and Descartes Rene Descartes’ “Meditations on First Philosophy” was written during a time of new ideas and those radical ideas’ subsequent scrutiny and rejection by the Vatican, Descartes’ idea on philosophy forever changed western philosophy by challenging the accepted ideas of Classical Greek Philosophers and Greek.

Meditations on First Philosophy by Rene Descartes is widely considered to be one of the top philosophical books of all time. For many, Meditations on First Philosophy is required reading for various courses and vetconnexx.coms: Since its publication in , Richard McKirahan’s Philosophy Before Socrates has become the standard sourcebook in Presocratic philosophy.

It provides a wide survey of Greek science, metaphysics, and moral and political philosophy, from their roots in myth to the philosophers and Sophists of the fifth century.

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